Molly Rocket surely has the capacity to hold her own in the massively competitive indie music scene. With a diverse sense of songwriting and a wildly diverse and powerful vocal style, Molly stamps her signature on every song she sings! Just listen to the previews. Her vocals not only have the power and range, they have the experience. You can feel the experience in her voice. If her presence shines through in her voice at that caliber, imagine her live show.

And Molly’s experience is not a secret. Early on Molly had a career as a ‘tween’ pop vocalist and had the opportunity to take the Disney starlet path. She chose a more organic road instead citing “the more I wrote the more I knew I had made the right call; it was clear to me that I had the drive to create specifically on my own terms – whatever those evolved to be. If I had followed that path of teen stardom my creative freedom would’ve suffered and I would’ve stunted my growth as an artist.”

In dissecting ‘More Than All This’, the diversity of each track is apparent, however, what may not be as easy to notice is that said diversity seamlessly flows from one track to the next, like the chapters of a good book. This is a skill only a good songwriter or writers can achieve as they are the ones that take the sum of the parts and recognize the value of the whole.

Consider ‘More Than All This’ a future classic. This future classic is out as of today! But links below.

Album Art 'More Than All This.'

Album Art ‘More Than All This.’

About ‘More Than All This’
Nashville’s power piano pop-rockers Molly Rocket release their debut EP, More Than All This, today (September 29), followed by a set at the inaugural Three Falls Fest in Hampshire, TN on September 30. The band packs a sound that is both full-bodied and funky, complete with roaring empowerment.

For More Than All This, Molly Rocket – frontwoman Molly Balsam and drummer Atticus Swartwood – worked with 3-time Grammy nominated drummer and producer Ken Coomer (Wilco, Will Hoge) in Coomer’s East Nashville studio. Grounded in Springsteen-inspired songwriting the powerful feminine presence a la Janis Joplin, and an ABBA sensibility, Molly Rocket delivers a roots-minded soul-rock style all their own; “a sound that is both retro and fresh at the same time,” says Impose Magazine.

The theatrical influence of Balsam’s songwriting can be traced back to her childhood growing up listening to and playing old jazz and pop standards with her dad, whereas the vulnerability of her lyrical style stems from the Boss himself. “My songs don’t necessarily sound like Bruce songs but what I’ve borrowed from his trope is that gut-wrenching passion he brings to his stories,” Balsam explains.


twitter25@themollyrocket 

to the stranger in the gas station who looked me up & down, saw my platform sandals, then said “you’re really not that tall” — thank u, i haven’t been burned by a stranger that bad in a while

About 3 hours ago from mighty mo (they/them)'s Twitter via Twitter for iPhone


Though the songs on More Than All This may not seem as overtly political as the duo’s last release “Friction (Dat Booty Doh),” (dubbed a “Feminist Party Anthem” by No Country For New Nashville), the EP sends a positive message of commanding feminine power in the face of toxic relationships, mental health and identity. Says Balsam: “these songs are about being unafraid to take a stand for your needs whether they be romantic, sexual, or in terms of your own emotional well-being.”

Balsam and Swartwood are not ones to shy away from getting political or advocating for issues important to them, something the duo doesn’t think should be considered provocative, which is unsurprising as the two met at Wesleyan University, known for its open-minded student body and activism. “It may make perfect sense to us that equality is important, or that racism and classism exist on an institutional level in this country, but not everyone recognizes things like that, so we make it our mission to try and engage and understand people and hopefully broaden their perspectives.”

Molly Rocket’s raw soul is equal parts unabashed and enchanting, sure to captivate Grace Potter and Bully fans alike.

SOURCE: Official Release

“A force to be reckoned with.”
– Music Update Central

“reminiscent of a young Ronnie Spector… The chorus, however, opens up and is pure rock with Balsam’s roar of defiance.”
– Impose Magazine

About Molly Rocket
Molly Rocket is a Power Piano Pop Rock Party in a bottle. Composed of Wesleyan University graduates Molly Rocket and S. Atticus Swartwood, the Nashville duo is primed to explode with their blend of pop, soul, rock, and punk. The pair looks to do something that has become very difficult—make artistically expressive popular music.

Lead singer, songwriter, and pianist Molly was born and raised in Manhattan and carries its in-your-face attitude with her in wherever she goes. While also born in The City, drummer and backup vocalist Atticus was raised in Des Moines, Iowa, and brings something that can be hard to find in New York—Midwestern positive vibes. After founding the band in 2012, they realized this was a golden combo. Molly Rocket is a nuclear reactor of patriarchy-smashing emotional energy, built to super-charge everyone that hears it. Now based in Nashville, Tennessee, that band is looking to spread that energy across the world.

To get a taste, look no further than the groups single and music video “Friction (Dat Booty Doh).” Dubbed a “Feminist Party Anthem” by No Country For New Nashville, the video shows that women can buck stereotypes and have a good time doing it. Then take a listen to “Too Late,” the first single off their upcoming EP, More Than All This. Deemed “retro and fresh at the same time” by Impose Magazine, the single is evidence of big things to come from the pair.

Recently, both Molly and Atticus have joined the rising East Nashville group TAYLS. After connecting with bandleader Taylor Cole, they seized the opportunity to spread their upbeat oomph even further. TAYLS is a psych/pop/punk experience looking to blow audiences away with shows reminiscent of The Flaming Lips or Of Montreal, and emotive rock-n-roll songs evoking Conor Oberst and Springsteen.

SOURCE: Official Bio

LINKS:
https://www.facebook.com/TheMollyRocket
https://twitter.com/themollyrocket
https://www.instagram.com/themollyrocket
https://open.spotify.com/artist/7BYncEDoojxr8WmAapIWso
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/molly-rocket/id1001284052
https://itun.es/us/uhMR7

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